User-agent: Mediapartners-Google* Disallow: Trucks World News: SHORTAGE OF DRIVERS * USA: or SKILLED LABOR WORKERS ? STUDY
Google
 
Loading

Apr 5, 2017

SHORTAGE OF DRIVERS * USA: or SKILLED LABOR WORKERS ? STUDY

* DC - Study: Automated trucking’s rapid rise overlooks the need for skilled labor


... The trucking industry as a whole relies on a variety of workers who are also less susceptible to automation according to O*NET. Truck drivers only make up 60 percent of the nearly 1.5 million workers in this industry. Other support workers fill roles across more than 150 different occupations, from truck mechanics to cargo agents to accountants, who have a relatively low degree of automation (25.5) on average. In this way, even as automated trucks may alter the actual shipment of goods, these technologies are unlikely to supplant all of the various technical, financial, and logistical work activities in support of that movement... Indeed, regardless of how these automated technologies play out, truck drivers and their fellow support workers are going to still carry out several specialized tasks, which will require continued on-the-job training and familiarity with precise sets of tools. O*NET tracks the particular types of tools used by individual occupations to better understand the technical skills and familiarity required to fill a given job, ranging from utility knives and two-way radios to personal computers and GPS receivers. On average, workers across all occupations nationally use about six tools to perform their jobs; however, workers in the trucking industry use about 27 tools on average, requiring a greater depth of knowledge and training that make it more difficult to automate their activities. Some workers use considerably more tools, including automotive service technicians (173), compliance officers (108), and truck mechanics (97)... 

... Finally, there are some overarching regulations that could stall the automation impacts from driverless technologies. States currently maintain oversight for whether driverless trucks can operate within their borders—and those regulations are inconsistent from state to state. Those inconsistencies will likely limit interstate shippers from using these vehicles to easily move goods across different states until certain regulatory thresholds are consistent. You can apply the same thinking to local regulations. Without approvals for driverless trucks to operate along specific rights of way—say a busy pedestrian corridor—municipalities and counties could make it difficult for trucking firms to use the technology... 
(Photo 1: Atlanta city scene - Photo 2. Automated trucking's rapid rise overlooks the need for skilled labor)  --   Washington, DC. USA - Brooking.edu, by Joseph Kane and Adie Tomer - March 21, 2017

Labels: ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home