User-agent: Mediapartners-Google* Disallow: Trucks World News: SPEED-LIMITING TECHNOLOGY for TRUCKS * USA: To travel at lower speeds
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Aug 31, 2016

SPEED-LIMITING TECHNOLOGY for TRUCKS * USA: To travel at lower speeds

* DC - NHTSA proposes device that would be required to new vehicles

--- The U.S. is seeking to forcibly limit how fast trucks, buses and other large vehicles can travel on the nation’s highways... A new proposal Friday would impose a nationwide limit by electronically capping speeds with a device on newly made U.S. vehicles that weigh more than 26,000 pounds. Regulators are considering a cap of 60, 65 or 68 miles per hour, though that could change. Whatever the speed limit, drivers would be physically prevented from exceeding it... The proposal, which comes from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, doesn’t force older heavy vehicles to add the speed-limiting technology, but the regulators are still considering it... The agencies said that limiting the speed of heavy vehicles to 60 mph could save as many as 498 lives annually. Limiting it to 65 mph could save as many as 214 lives, and limiting it to 68 mph could save as many as 96 lives. There are 3.6 million big rigs on U.S. roads... The proposal is based on available safety data and the additional benefit of better fuel economy.The government said capping speeds for new large vehicles would reduce the 1,115 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks that occur each year and save $1 billion in fuel costs... While the news is being welcomed by some safety advocates and nonprofessional drivers, many truckers said such changes could lead to dangerous scenarios where they are traveling at much lower speeds than everyone else... 
(Photo, by TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS - Cars and trucks travel on Interstate 5 north through Fife, Wash. The federal government says capping speeds for new large vehicles would reduce the 1,115 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks that occur each year) -- Washington, DC, USA - Associated Press/The WSJ - Aug. 26, 2016

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